Information & Research

Evidence

Scientific research into the potential biological, health and environmental effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation dates back at least as far as the development of radar during World War II. Much of the initial research in the United States was conducted by the U.S. military and remains classified. Since the 1940s, thousands of scientific studies have been undertaken worldwide into the subject. Based on the consensus that has emerged thus far from this research, national and international RF radiation protective standards are presently based almost exclusively on so-called ‘thermal’ effects of RF radiation, i.e., effects caused by power levels high enough to heat living issue, as in a microwave oven. The debate at present among scientists is the nature and extent of so-called ‘non-thermal’ effects of RF radiation, i.e., effects caused by low-intensity exposures to RF radiation used by cellular phone networks, WiFi, Bluetooth, and other similar technologies. As the evidence cited below indicates, these non-thermal biological effects do take place; the question is whether and how they will translate into adverse health and environmental effects today and in the years to come.



Health and environmental effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation.

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